Empowerment is Everything

Imagine even better than the best you can already imagine….if not you, then who?

Ear food

I feel so honoured that someone reading the EIE website was inspired to share her thoughts in a well written post about what we listen to. And I will post it as a comment to this page…

Her musings gave rise to me pondering what I listen to. I read a lot. I watch a lot of interesting movies and such. I also watch a lot of junk! I listen to a lot of junk too I realized. Or maybe more accurately I have music playing in the background of my life and I’m not really present with it. Isn’t that the key of anything you have around you that feeds into your energy system? To be present with it, aware and therefore channeling it’s energy in a conscious manner?

I love music. There is so much to listen to and I can find songs that fit any mood I’m in. I have playlists on my ipod for almost every emotion I can think of. Music has the power to really change my mood, or to enhance the mood I’m already experiencing. When I choose to be present with my listening choices.

A few years ago I had to lend my entire music collection to a friend, as I went on a journey where my only my ipod could travel, and when I came back to it almost a year later, I realized that many of the cd’s just didn’t float my boat anymore. I found some new songs for my ipod that filled my emotional needs at the time, but I began a phase in my life where music was not a conscious choice. I listened to the radio a lot, or nothing at all. Sad really, because I have recently re-discovered how important music really is to my energy system and have made a personal promise to myself to keep exploring all that this universe has to offer my soul and to re-visit the songs that struck chords in some pivotal moments in my past – to hear them all with the experience and wisdom my observer now possesses.

It’s amazing. If you really listen to the lyrics that moved you. Regardless of what the artist intended, or perhaps with the awareness of what they intended. I especially like Alanis Morrisette lyrics for an introspective journey. I was intrigued by her opening for the Dalai Lama when he came to Ottawa a few years back and realized that she is on an amazing spiritual journey and she shares it through her music. She has found her creative outlet for sharing her life lessons. Many of the songs that calm me down, help me focus, or remind me of ‘who I am’ seem to be chock full of lyrics that echo my thoughts, the books I read on spiritual growth or even the tele-classes I’ve taken or the words of wisdom passed on to me by those I encounter. When I choose to be present with the lyrics, and the song, and the moment it is playing.

I think the moral of the story for me when it comes to ‘What are you listening to?’ is really to just stop and ask yourself this question. Breathe deeply, pause, ask the question quietly to yourself and then just listen – the answer will come to you. Then make conscious choices about what you are listening to. Find what moves you and inspires you and serves your higher purpose. It could very well be a head-banging tune that gets you air-punching & kicking your frustrations from a rough day at work in your living room and expelling all the pent-up energy you could imagine until you fall down exhausted and put on a little female-wronged and finding herself and her strength again tune to help you cry the rest out. There is no judgement. There is no right and wrong thing to listen to. Everything serves a purpose. The right attitude in place can elevate any situation. Truly.

The key is to be conscious. In the moment you are listening. Be aware and let that awareness guide you. And that may mean losing yourself in the moment too! Letting go. Feeling it fully and completely. Maybe even make your own music and share with the world your own voice. However it goes for you, I hope you feel blessed by what you are listening to today…and that you have a non-judgemental awareness when you hear what others are choosing to listen to as well…

Namaste,

Pamela

2 thoughts on “Ear food

  1. “…I found a reason for me
    To change who I used to be
    A reason to start over new
    And the reason is you….”
    – Hoobastank, “The Reason”

    To be honest, I’m not sure if these lyrics are meant to be about connection or separation. That’s the neat thing about music. The creator has one interpretation in mind when writing it and we, as audience members, bring our own flavours of meaning to the experience when we listen, sing and dance along.

    One of my dearest friends, my elder by more than 20 years, often talks about how “music is the soundtrack of our lives”, a quote from Dick Clark. Over the past year, Itunes has transformed the size and scope of my life’s soundtrack. I currently have over 1400 songs loaded into my computer-jukebox, which is an astounding number for a child of the 70’s but a notable pittance compared to the music libraries of the Gen Y/Millenials and their little sisters.

    Searching Itunes, for me, is like opening Christmas presents everyday. I have so many jubilant “oh yeah!” moments when I discover long-lost songs of my youth that are available for my enjoyment at the click of a credit card. By comparison to my peers, I didn’t buy that many $30 CD’s when the medium first came into the North American market because I was only inclined towards one or two songs on an album that held the right mix of relevant lyrics and groovy beats to suit my tastes. One Hit Wonders of Pop were pretty much my genre, I’ll admit.

    Just last week, I expanded my collection – free of cost – by ripping selections from my husband’s CD inventory. Now I can click my way through “our soundtrack”, a compilation of past and present, from his high-school-angry-white-boy-wanna-be-gangsta days and my lovestruck-pining-after-can’t-have’s days at uni. I threw down $140 for the sweet acoustic glory of a Logitech sub-woofer and speakers and now I’m rocking out to favourites new and old. Sort by genre, set on party shuffle, whatever mood strikes me. And the latest Itunes interface has the super-slick flipping of album artwork that you’ve seen on Iphone and Itouch commercials, directly marketing to us 30-somethings who would gingerly flip through our vinyl covers back in the day. I love you, Steve Jobs.

    Back to the point: about a decade ago, a mental health volunteer suggested to me that we should pay more attention to what we listen to. Are we bathing ourselves in apathy, self-loathing and regret by the song choices that fill our heads? Are we weeping vicariously through the gut-wrenching melancholy and desired vengeance on ex-lovers that are expressed by our favourite musical artists? Do those moments of angst turn into a day, a week or a lifetime when set on repeat?

    I’m by no means suggesting that you should only have Josh Groban and Charlotte Church loaded on your music players. We all need to head bang to a little Kurt Cobain from time to time. It’s about making a conscious choice of the songs and artists we listen to as a reflection of who we are and the energy that we give and take from the world. Do you want to bass-thump your way down city streets, ready to flip off the next guy who cuts you off? Or, do you want to hop around barefoot in your living room, recalling your dance club days gone by?

    Whatever your flavour, I hope you’re having a good time expressing yourself!

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